OBITUARY: Journalism as a weapon: The life of Patrick John Booth

  • James Hollings Journalism Education Association of New Zealand (JEANZ) - Massey University

Abstract

Many countries have their Watergate moment, a scandal that envelopes not only mystery, intrigue, and human tragedy, but also something bigger, some kind of challenge to a country’s deepest beliefs about itself. What the US journalism scholar Michael Schudson called a country’s central moral values. For New Zealand, a good case could be made that our Watergate moment was the Thomas case. Like Watergate, it revealed ugly truths about corruption within some of our most respected institutions, and investigative journalism played a central role. Like Watergate, it was also a collective loss of innocence, and opened a very deep wound.

References

Booth, P.: Biographical notes. (2017).
Booth, P. (1997). Deadline: My story. Auckland: Viking.
Booth, P. (2009). Interview with the author, Hollings, J.
Carter, V. (2018). Interview with the author, Hollings, J.
Davies, V. (2018). Interview with the author, Hollings, J.
Hodgson, T. (2018). Interview with the author, Hollings, J.
NZ Government (1980). Report of the Royal Commission to inquire into the circumstances of the convictions of Arthur Allan Thomas for the murders of David Harvey Crewe and Jeannette Lenore Crewe. Wellington: NZ Government.
Schudson, M. (2004). Notes on scandal and the Watergate legacy. American Behavioral Scientist, 47(9), 1231-1238.
Thomas, A. A. (2018). Interview with the author, Hollings, J.
Pat Booth
Published
17-07-2018

How to Cite
Hollings, J. (2018). OBITUARY: Journalism as a weapon: The life of Patrick John Booth. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(1), 205-214. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjr.v24i1.416