About the Journal

Focus and Scope

While one objective of Pacific Journalism Review is research into Pacific journalism theory and practice, the journal has also expanding its interest into new areas of research and inquiry that reflect the broader impact of contemporary media practice and education. A particular focus is on the cultural politics of the media, including the following issues: new media and social movements, indigenous cultures in the age of globalisation, the politics of tourism and development, the role of the media and the formation of national identity and the cultural influence of New Zealand as a branch of the global economy within the Pacific region. It also has a special interest in climate change, environmental and development studies in the media and communication and vernacular media in the region. For more information about PJR and its editorial team visit here.

Te Reo Māori Name: Te Koakoa

Te Koakoa is one of the Te Reo Māori names for the sooty shearwater, or muttonbird (Puffinsus griseus), Sooty shearwaters are a common dark seabird off coastal New Zealand and the Pacific, and are known for their spectacular flocks. Koakoa has a more common meaning of happiness and joyfulness in a research context. The metaphorical name has been contributed by the late Dr John Moorfield, Professor of Māori Innovation and Development with AUT's Te Ara Poutama.

Peer Review Process

Pacific Journalism Review has a double blind peer review process. Two reviewers with expertise in the research field(s) related to submitted papers are usually selected, with the reviewers frequently drawn from the Editorial Board members as appropriate. In the case of major differences between reviewers, a third blind peer reviewer is sought. The current edition editors manage the revisions process.

Publication Frequency

Journal articles will be published twice a year collectively, as part of an issue with its own Table of Contents.

Open Access Policy

By publishing in Pacific Journalism Review, the authors grant the journal a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International Licence   providing open access to its content with attribution on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author and within the terms of the Creative Commons licence assigned to the content.

The journal is APC-free. Pacific Journalism Review does not charge any article processing, administration or submission charges.

PJR old archive home page (prior to 2016): https://pjreview.aut.ac.nz

Archiving and preservation

This journal's content is preserved using the the LOCKSS and CLOCKSS archiving systems.

LOCKSS is a distributed archiving system among participating libraries and permits those libraries to create permanent archives of the journal for purposes of preservation and restoration.

CLOCKSS is global archive that preserves content on behalf of all libraries and scholars worldwide. CLOCKSS preserves content in 12 strategically chosen libraries across the globe to optimize the content’s safety against political and environmental threats.

Sponsors

Frontline is a specialised journalism-as-research section supported by the Australian Centre for Independent Journalism at the University of Technology Sydney. More information from the Frontline editor Professor Wendy Bacon.
wendybacon1@gmail.com

Sources of Support

Journalism Education Association of New Zealand (JEANZ) Copies of PJR are distributed to all JEANZ members.

Journal History

The Pacific Journalism Review: Te Koakoa is a peer-reviewed journal examining media issues and communication in the South Pacific, Asia-Pacific, Australia and New Zealand. Founded by Professor David Robie in 1994 at the University of Papua New Guinea, it was later published at the University of the South Pacific. PJR has been published since 2007 by the Pacific Media Centre in the School of Communication Studies, Auckland University of Technology. From 2020 it is being published by Asia Pacific Network in association with Tuwhera Publishing at AUT and the University of the South Pacific Journalism Programme. Themes: While one objective is research into Pacific journalism theory and practice, the journal has also expanding its interest into new areas of research and inquiry that reflect the broader impact of contemporary media practice and education. A particular focus is on the cultural politics of the media, including the following issues: new media and social movements, indigenous cultures in the age of globalisation, the politics of tourism and development, the role of the media and the formation of national identity and the cultural influence of New Zealand as a branch of the global economy within the Pacific region. It also has a special interest in climate change, environmental and development studies in the media and communication and vernacular media in the region. For more information about PJR and contributors: http://www.pjreview.info/about