The job of thinking people: Dialogues with Sefita Hao'uli, Kalafi Moala, and Melino Maka

  • Teena Brown Pulu

Abstract

Howard Zinn wrote “it is the job of thinking people not to be on the side of the executioners” (Zinn, 2003).  Democracy by Zinn’s view operates beyond state nationalism and a capitalist economy.  Represented in people movements, it is the grassroots activism, protests, and boycotts of the people from below that gives democracy meaning.  This third essay of four prompted by dialogues with Sefita Hao’uli, Kalafi Moala, and Melino Maka explores the political climate in which people movements are transmitted and spread in present day Tonga.  If it is “the job of thinking people not to be on the side of the executioners” then which side is the executioner? (Zinn, 2010).  Considering the Nuku’alofa riot of November 16th 2006 muddied pro-democracy believability, how have people movements regrouped and recovered?  Social activism in this age of political reform conveys what exactly about development?  And how do people movements influence Tongan critics, the thinking people, to write social criticism and political commentary?

Published
2013-01-30
How to Cite
Brown Pulu, T. (2013). The job of thinking people: Dialogues with Sefita Hao’uli, Kalafi Moala, and Melino Maka. Te Kaharoa, 6(1). https://doi.org/10.24135/tekaharoa.v6i1.71
Section
Articles